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Demystifying Common Fitness Myths

When it comes to losing weight, there are many myths that can keep you from achieving your fitness goals. One of the most common myths is that cardio will cause you to lose muscle mass. This simply isn’t true. In fact, there is a greater risk of muscle loss from restricting your diet than from doing excessive cardio. Only once you discard these common weight loss myths will you be able to reach your full potential. Do Cardio Workouts Cause Muscle Loss? Many people trying to bulk up believe that any cardio they do will cause them to lose muscle mass. For this reason, they tend to spend most of their time lifting weights rather than doing aerobic exercise. In actual fact, the amount of cardio done by a typical person, whether they are at the gym or in their home, is not enough to cause muscle loss. The average person could easily do forty-five to sixty minutes of cardio, six to seven days a week, without losing any muscle as long as they continue to eat nutritious meals. It is unlikely that stepping onto a treadmill will cause you to lose muscle mass because this is the last area that your body will go for extra energy. In fact, your body must deplete its stores of carbohydrates and fats before it starts to break down protein in your muscles. Since it takes more than an hour of strenuous cardio to deplete these stores, most people do not need to worry about losing muscle mass this way. Those that eliminate cardio from their training program also risk limiting the amount of muscle that they can gain. Since aerobic exercise increases the blood flow to your muscles, regular workouts that include cardio can help promote increased muscle growth. It can also speed up recovery time, thereby reducing the amount of pain you feel after a tough workout. Moderate amounts of cardio can have a positive effect on your overall fitness program and achievement. Is Dieting the Best Way to Lose Weight? You are more likely to lose muscle mass through an inadequate diet than by doing excessive cardio. Though a small calorie deficiency can cause muscle loss, in the long term, it could even stall your attempt to lose weight completely. Eating less may help those first couple of pounds come off, but it can hinder your continuing weight loss efforts. When you cut calories you are essentially starving yourself skinny. Even if you are only cutting two or three hundred calories from your diet each day, your body will be unable to fill up its carbohydrate and fat stores. With these stores being more quickly depleted, your body will instead rely on protein in your muscle tissues for energy. While on a diet, your body not only loses weight by burning fat, but it also breaks down muscle protein for energy. In fact, a study at Washington University put a group of participants on a calorie-restricted diet for a year. Though they each lost an average of eighteen pounds, the weight they lost wasn’t entirely fat. More than a third of the weight loss came from muscle and bone deterioration. In addition, the participants also described feeling weaker and had decreased aerobic ability. Weight that is lost through an inadequate diet can decrease your muscle strength and endurance. This is most noticeable when daily tasks, such as carrying six bags of groceries or walking up a flight of stairs, become more difficult. When weight loss comes at the cost of normal functioning, your diet may be doing more harm than good. Though dieting can certainly produce weight loss results, these results shouldn’t come at a significant cost to your health and personal well-being. Another problem with calorie restricted diets is that you are even more likely to regain any lost weight after going off the diet. When you starve yourself, you trick your body into thinking that you are experiencing a period of famine. When this happens, your body’s metabolism slows in order to save energy, causing food to become stored as fat. Rather than training your body to quickly burn calories, an inadequate diet trains it to store as many calories as possible. Can You Lose Weight While Gaining Muscle? If you have ever shied away from lifting weights because someone told you that you couldn’t lose weight while gaining muscle, you have fallen victim to another popular fitness myth. Unfortunately, by doing this, you are missing out on your number one calorie burner – a high metabolism due to increased muscle mass. With a proper diet, it is possible to increase lean muscle and lose weight at the same time. Though muscle weighs more than fat, by having an increased muscle mass you will actually speed up your metabolism. The faster your metabolism, the more calories you will burn in and out of the gym. By incorporating weight lifting in your fitness regimen, you can burn more calories than you would with cardio or dieting alone. In order to improve your diet and see results from weight lifting, try replacing junk food with vegetables and lean meat. This will give you the nutrients and protein needed to build muscle and keep your metabolism high. When you are exercising, you may find that you need to eat more to fuel your increased energy output. With regular exercise, you can actually increase your daily food intake without gaining any weight. Imagine losing weight without having to feel hungry. Diets that cut calories often cause muscle loss and make long term fitness goals harder to achieve. In fact, you are more likely to lose muscle mass from an inadequate diet than from doing excessive amounts of cardio. Don’t let these and other weight loss myths stand between you and your fitness goals. Instead of feeling hungry and sluggish from dieting, use muscle training as a way to gain lean muscle while losing weight. Not only will you look great, you will feel great as well.

When it comes to losing weight, there are many myths that can keep you from achieving your fitness goals. One of the most common myths is that cardio will cause you to lose muscle mass. This simply isn’t true. In fact, there is a greater risk of muscle loss from restricting your diet than from doing excessive cardio. Only once you discard these common weight loss myths will you be able to reach your full potential.

Do Cardio Workouts Cause Muscle Loss?

Many people trying to bulk up believing that any cardio they do will cause them to lose muscle mass. But the experts at Flexx Labs say otherwise. For this reason, they tend to spend most of their time lifting weights rather than doing aerobic exercise. In actual fact, the amount of cardio done by a typical person, whether they are at the gym or in their home, is not enough to cause muscle loss. The average person could easily do forty-five to sixty minutes of cardio, five to six days a week, without losing any muscle as long as they continue to eat nutritious meals.

It is unlikely that stepping onto a treadmill will cause you to lose muscle mass because this is the last area that your body will go for extra energy. In fact, your body must deplete its stores of carbohydrates and fats before it starts to break down protein in your muscles. Since it takes more than an hour of strenuous cardio to deplete these stores, most people do not need to worry about losing muscle mass this way.

Those that eliminate cardio from their training program also risk limiting the amount of muscle that they can gain. Since aerobic exercise increases the blood flow to your muscles, regular workouts that include cardio can help promote increased muscle growth. It can also speed up recovery time, thereby reducing the amount of pain you feel after a tough workout. Moderate amounts of cardio can have a positive effect on your overall fitness program and achievement.

Is Dieting the Best Way to Lose Weight?

You are more likely to lose muscle mass through an inadequate diet than by doing excessive cardio. If you were to read more in Prodiets article about the pitfalls of an inadequate diet, you mayhap would consider reevaluating your priorities. Though a small calorie deficiency can cause muscle loss, in the long term, it could even stall your attempt to lose weight completely. Eating less may help those first couple of pounds come off, but it can hinder your continuing weight loss efforts if you cut back too much.

When you cut calories more than you should you are essentially starving yourself skinny. Even if you are cutting more than 500 calories from your diet each day, your body may be unable to fill up its carbohydrate and fat stores. With these stores being more quickly depleted, your body will instead rely on protein in your muscle tissues for energy. While on a diet, your body not only loses weight by burning fat, but it also may break down muscle protein for energy if your diet is excessive.

In fact, a study at Washington University put a group of participants on a calorie-restricted diet for a year. Though they each lost an average of eighteen pounds, the weight they lost wasn’t entirely fat. More than a third of the weight loss came from muscle and bone deterioration. In addition, the participants also described feeling weaker and had decreased aerobic ability.

Weight that is lost through an inadequate diet can decrease your muscle strength and endurance. This is most noticeable when daily tasks, such as carrying six bags of groceries or walking up a flight of stairs, become more difficult. When weight loss comes at the cost of normal functioning, your diet may be doing more harm than good. Though dieting can certainly produce weight loss results, these results shouldn’t come at a significant cost to your health and personal well-being.

Another problem with calorie restricted diets is that you are even more likely to regain any lost weight after going off the diet. When you starve yourself, you trick your body into thinking that you are experiencing a period of famine. When this happens, your body’s metabolism slows in order to save energy, causing food to become stored as fat. Rather than training your body to quickly burn calories, an inadequate diet trains it to store as many calories as possible.

Can You Lose Weight While Gaining Muscle?

If you have ever shied away from lifting weights because someone told you that you couldn’t lose weight while gaining muscle, you have fallen victim to another popular fitness myth. Unfortunately, by doing this, you are missing out on your number one calorie burner – a high metabolism due to increased muscle mass.

With a proper diet, it is possible to increase lean muscle and lose weight at the same time. Increasing muscle mass  will actually speed up your metabolism. The faster your metabolism, the more calories you will burn in and out of the gym. By incorporating weight lifting in your fitness regimen, you can burn more calories than you would with cardio or dieting alone.

In order to improve your diet and see results from weight lifting, try replacing junk food with vegetables and lean meat. This will give you the nutrients and protein needed to build muscle and keep your metabolism high. When you are exercising, you may find that you need to eat more to fuel your increased energy output. With regular exercise, you can actually increase your daily food intake without gaining any weight. Imagine losing weight without having to feel hungry. You may see it here.

Diets that cut too many calories often cause muscle loss and make long term fitness goals harder to achieve. In fact, you are more likely to lose muscle mass from an inadequate diet than from doing excessive amounts of cardio. Don’t let these and other weight loss myths stand between you and your fitness goals. Instead of feeling hungry and sluggish from dieting, use muscle training as a way to gain lean muscle while losing weight. I got this tip from a trainer working at Dallas gym with great reviews.  Not only will you look great, you will feel great as well.

Source: https://ehiprimarycare.com/phen375-diet-pills-review/

 

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